Map of states in Mexico after elections: which party dominates the country

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In the context of an election year in Mexico, where new governors will be elected in nine key states and the presidential campaign will unfold, the June 2nd elections represent a crucial milestone in national politics.

With the possibility of significant changes in the partisan affiliation of these states, a reconfiguration of the country’s political map is expected.

During this electoral day, citizens of Chiapas, Mexico City, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Morelos, Puebla, Tabasco, Veracruz, and Yucatán decided who their next state leaders will be.

With the power of their vote, they directly influenced the distribution of political power and the colors that will represent each federal entity.

Who won in the states?

After a contested electoral day in Mexico on June 2nd, the results have begun to take shape, offering an initial vision of what the country’s political map looks like.

Here we present the preliminary results, subject to change as the vote count is completed and possible challenges are resolved:

  • Chiapas: Eduardo Ramírez, candidate of the “Let’s Keep Making History” coalition (Morena-PT and PVEM), is profiled for the state of Morena.
  • Mexico City: Clara Brugada, representing “Let’s Keep Making History” (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the country’s capital, where Morena was present.
  • Guanajuato: Libia Dennise García, from the “Strength and Heart” coalition (PAN-PRI and PRD), is profiled for the state of National Action.
  • Jalisco: Pablo Lemus, from the same party, is profiled for the state of Citizen’s Movement.
  • Morelos: Margarita González, from “Let’s Keep Making History” (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the state of the Social Encounter Party.
  • Puebla: Alejandro Armenta, from the “Let’s Keep Making History” coalition (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the state of Morena.
  • Tabasco: Javier May, from the “Let’s Keep Making History” coalition (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the state of Morena.
  • Veracruz: Rocio Nahle, from the “Let’s Keep Making History” coalition (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the state of Morena.
  • Yucatán: Joaquín Díaz Mena, from the “Let’s Keep Making History” coalition (Morena, PT, and PVEM), is profiled for the state of National Action.

These results reflect the democratic will of Mexican citizens and will have a significant impact on the country’s political landscape in the coming years.

What color did the states turn?

The distribution of colors on Mexico’s political map reflects the reality that emerged from this electoral day.

What color were they BEFORE the 2024 elections?

In Mexico’s political history over the last few decades, changes in state power have been a reflection not only of electoral dynamics but also of the social and economic transformations that have marked the lives of its inhabitants.

Through a detailed look at the country’s most important states due to the electoral process they face, and the parties that have governed them since 2000, we can better understand the political evolution of Mexico.

  • Chiapas: A key state in the current elections, Chiapas has witnessed the alternation of several parties in power. Since 2000, it has been in the hands of the PRD, the Green Ecologist Party of Mexico, the PRI, and is currently under the administration of Morena.
  • Mexico City: The country’s capital, the epicenter of national politics, has historically been a bastion of the left. The PRD and now Morena have maintained political control of the city, with emblematic leaders such as Andrés Manuel López Obrador and Claudia Sheinbaum.
  • Guanajuato: Known for its conservative tradition, Guanajuato has been dominated by the PAN in recent decades. Figures like Vicente Fox and Diego Sinhue Rodríguez Vallejo have led the state, maintaining a political line aligned with market economic policies.
  • Jalisco: A state of great economic and cultural importance, Jalisco has been under the dominion of the PAN, the PRI, and now the Citizen’s Movement. Leaderships such as those of Aristóteles Sandoval and Enrique Alfaro reflect the political diversity of the state.
  • Morelos: The land of Emiliano Zapata, Morelos has experienced an alternation between the PAN, the PRD, the Social Encounter Party, and currently Morena.
  • Puebla: A state with a rich history and economic relevance, Puebla has been under the PAN, the PRI, and is currently governed by Morena. Leaders like Rafael Moreno Valle and Miguel Barbosa Huerta have been in charge of Puebla’s politics.
  • Tabasco: The land of oil, Tabasco has been governed by the PRI and now by Morena. Figures like Andrés Granier Melo and Adán Augusto López Hernández have faced significant economic and social challenges during their terms.
  • Veracruz: A state with great cultural diversity, Veracruz has been dominated by the PRI, the PAN, and now Morena. Leaders like Javier Duarte and Cuitláhuac García have faced problems of corruption and violence during their administrations.
  • Yucatán: With its rich history and culture, Yucatán has been under the dominion of the PRI, the PAN, and now Morena. Leaders like Mauricio Vila have been in charge of the state administration.

Source: Milenio